Victorian Soundscapes

Emily Auerbach , Maestros , Dilettantes , and Philistines : The Musician in the Victorian Novel ( New York : Lang , 1989 , 166. See also William Baker , George Eliot and Judaism ( Salzburg : Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur ...

Author: John M. Picker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195151917

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

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Far from the hushed restraint we associate with the Victorians, their world pulsated with sound. This book shows how, in more ways than one, Victorians were hearing things. John Picker draws upon literary and scientific works to recapture the Victorian sense of aural discovery.
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Figures of the Imagination

GB Lbl Document Supply MUSIC DON1039; Derek Scott's performance of this song is available at http://www.victorianweb.org/mt/parlorsongs/4.html (accessed December 30, 2015). Emily Auerbach, Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The ...

Author: Roger Hansford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317135302

Category: Music

Page: 300

View: 266

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This new study of the intersection of romance novels with vocal music records a society on the cusp of modernisation, with a printing industry emerging to serve people’s growing appetites for entertainment amidst their changing views of religion and the occult. No mere diversion, fiction was integral to musical culture and together both art forms reveal key intellectual currents that circulated in the early nineteenth-century British home and were shared by many consumers. Roger Hansford explores relationships between music produced in the early 1800s for domestic consumption and the fictional genre of romance, offering a new view of romanticism in British print culture. He surveys romance novels by Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Sir Walter Scott, James Hogg, Edward Bulwer and Charles Kingsley in the period 1790–1850, interrogating the ways that music served to create mood and atmosphere, enlivened social scenes and contributed to plot developments. He explores the connections between musical scenes in romance fiction and the domestic song literature, treating both types of source and their intersection as examples of material culture. Hansford’s intersectional reading revolves around a series of imaginative figures – including the minstrel, fairies, mermaids, ghosts, and witches, and Christians engaged both in virtue and vice – the identities of which remained consistent as influence passed between the art forms. While romance authors quoted song lyrics and included musical descriptions and characters, their novels recorded and modelled the performance of songs by the middle and upper classes, influencing the work of composers and the actions of performers who read romance fiction.
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Women Musicians in Victorian Fiction 1860 1900 Representations of Music Science and Gender in the Leisured Home

... 162-3 Samuel Butler on 292-4 and subconscious thought 89-91 in Victorian novels 9 see also physiological psychology Atlas, Allan 3 Auerbach, Emily 31 Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel 2, ...

Author: Phyllis Weliver

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351744485

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

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This title was first publushed in 2000. Phyllis Weliver investigates representations of female musicians in British novels from 1860 to 1900 with regard to changing gender roles, musical practices and scientific discourses. During this time women were portrayed in complex and nuanced ways as they played and sang in family drawing rooms. Women in the 19th century were judged on their manners, appearance, language and other accomplishments such as sewing or painting, but music stood out as an area where women were encouraged to take centre stage and demonstrate their genteel education, graceful movements and self-expression. However within the novels of the Victorian were begining to move away from portraying the musical accomplishments of middle- and upper-class women as feminine and worthwhile towards depicting musical women as truly dangerous. This book explores the reasons for this reaction and the way labels and images were constructed to show extremes of behaviour, and it looks at whether the fiction was depicting the real trends in music at the time.
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Spaces of the Sacred and Profane

Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel. New York: Peter Lang, 1989. Bakhtin, Mikhail. The Dialogic Imagination. Ed. Michael Holquist. Trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist.

Author: Elizabeth A. Bridgham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135863128

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 126

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This study examines the unique cultural space of Victorian cathedral towns as they appear in the literary work of Charles Dickens and Anthony Trollope, arguing that Dickens and Trollope use the cathedral town’s enclosure, and its overt connections between sacred and secular, present and past, as an ideal locus from which to critique Victorian religious attitudes, aesthetic anxieties, business practices, and even immigration. By displacing these issues from the metropolis, these social authors defamiliarize them, raising what might have been considered strictly urban problems to the level of national crises. By situating contemporary debates in cathedral towns, Dickens and Trollope complicate the restrictive dichotomy between urban and rural space often drawn by contemporary critics and Victorian fiction writers alike. In this book, Bridgham focuses on the appearance of three such key concerns appearing in the cathedral towns of each writer: religious fragmentation, the social value of artistic labor, and the Gothic revival. Dickens and Trollope reject Romantic nostalgia by concentrating on the ancient, yet vital (as opposed to ruined) edifices of the cathedrals, and by demonstrating ways in which modern sensibilities, politics, and comforts supersede the values of the cloister. In this sense, their cathedral towns are not idealized escapes; rather, they reflect the societies of which they are a part.
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The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction

______. 'Wilkie Collins on Music and Musicians', Journal of the Royal Musical Association 124 (1999) 255–70. Auerbach, Emily. Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel (New York: Peter Lang, 1989).

Author: Nicky Losseff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317028062

Category: Music

Page: 320

View: 173

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The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction seeks to address fundamental questions about the function, meaning and understanding of music in nineteenth-century culture and society, as mediated through works of fiction. The eleven essays here, written by musicologists and literary scholars, range over a wide selection of works by both canonical writers such as Austen, Benson, Carlyle, Collins, Gaskell, Gissing, Eliot, Hardy, du Maurier and Wilde, and less-well-known figures such as Gertrude Hudson and Elizabeth Sara Sheppard. Each essay explores different strategies for interpreting the idea of music in the Victorian novel. Some focus on the degree to which scenes involving music illuminate what music meant to the writer and contemporary performers and listeners, and signify musical tastes of the time and the reception of particular composers. Other essays in the volume examine aspects of gender, race, sexuality and class that are illuminated by the deployment of music by the novelist. Together with its companion volume, The Figure of Music in Nineteenth-Century British Poetry edited by Phyllis Weliver (Ashgate, 2005), this collection suggests a new network of methodologies for the continuing cultural and social investigation of nineteenth-century music as reflected in that period's literary output.
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Music in Other Words

English novels are the principal subject of Emily Auerbach,Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel (New York: Peter Lang, 1989). Structural and critical rather than social-historical studies include ...

Author: Ruth A. Solie

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520238459

Category: Music

Page: 223

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Annotation A collection of essays on music in Victorian life and literature by one of the leaders in the field.
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Sound Sin and Conversion in Victorian England

Atlas, Allan W. The Wheatstone English Concertina in Victorian England. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996. Auerbach, Emily. Maestros, Dilettantes and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel ...

Author: Julia Grella O'Connell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317091530

Category: Music

Page: 172

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The plight of the fallen woman is one of the salient themes of nineteenth-century art and literature; indeed, the ubiquity of the trope galvanized the Victorian conscience and acted as a spur to social reform. In some notable examples, Julia Grella O’Connell argues, the iconography of the Victorian fallen woman was associated with music, reviving an ancient tradition conflating the practice of music with sin and the abandonment of music with holiness. The prominence of music symbolism in the socially-committed, quasi-religious paintings of the Pre-Raphaelites and their circle, and in the Catholic-Wagnerian novels of George Moore, gives evidence of the survival of a pictorial language linking music with sin and conversion, and shows, even more remarkably, that this language translated fairly easily into the cultural lexicon of Victorian Britain. Drawing upon music iconography, art history, patristic theology, and sensory theory, Grella O’Connell investigates female fallenness and its implications against the backdrop of the social and religious turbulence of the mid-nineteenth century.
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Searching for Jane Austen

See my discussion of this in Maestros , Dilettantes , and Philistines : The Musician in the Victorian Novel ( New York : Peter Lang , 1989 ) and Phyllis Weliver's Women Musicians in Victorian Fiction , 1860-1900 ( Burlington ...

Author: Emily Auerbach

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299201848

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 423

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Searching for Jane Austen demolishes with wit and vivacity the often-held view of "Jane," a decorous maiden aunt writing her small drawing-room stories of teas and balls. Emily Auerbach presents a different Jane Austen—a brilliant writer who, despite the obstacles facing women of her time, worked seriously on improving her craft and became one of the world’s greatest novelists, a master of wit, irony, and character development. In this beautifully illustrated and lively work, Auerbach surveys two centuries of editing, censoring, and distorting Austen’s life and writings. Auerbach samples Austen’s flamboyant, risqué adolescent works featuring heroines who get drunk, lie, steal, raise armies, and throw rivals out of windows. She demonstrates that Austen constantly tested and improved her skills by setting herself a new challenge in each of her six novels. In addition, Auerbach considers Austen’s final irreverent writings, discusses her tragic death at the age of forty-one, and ferrets out ridiculous modern adaptations and illustrations, including ads, cartoons, book jackets, newspaper articles, plays, and films from our own time. An appendix reprints a ground-breaking article that introduced Mark Twain’s "Jane Austen," an unfinished and unforgettable essay in which Twain and Austen enter into mortal combat.
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The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination

Maestros, Dilettantes, and Philistines: The Musician in the Victorian Novel. New York: Peter Lang, 1989. Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature, tr. Willard R. Trask.

Author: Leonid Livak

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804775625

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 512

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This book proposes that the idea of the Jews in European cultures has little to do with actual Jews, but rather is derived from the conception of Jews as Christianity's paradigmatic Other, eternally reenacting their morally ambiguous New Testament role as the Christ-bearing and -killing chosen people of God. Through new readings of canonical Russian literary texts by Gogol, Turgenev, Chekhov, Babel, and others, the author argues that these European writers—Christian, secular, and Jewish—based their representation of Jews on the Christian exegetical tradition of anti-Judaism. Indeed, Livak disputes the classification of some Jewish writers as belonging to "Jewish literature," arguing that such an approach obscures these writers' debt to European literary traditions and their ambivalence about their Jewishness. This work seeks to move the study of Russian literature, and Russian-Jewish literature in particular, down a new path. It will stir up controversy around Christian-Jewish cultural interaction; the representation of otherness in European arts and folklore; modern Jewish experience; and Russian literature and culture.
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Maestros Dilettantes and Philistines

Auerbach's fascinating and comprehensive study reveals that Dickens, Thackeray, Hardy, Eliot, and other novelists of -das Land ohne Musik- found music to be a rich source of metaphor."

Author: Emily Auerbach

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: STANFORD:36105034376017

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 306

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From long-haired Jewish composers to young women playing -a little- piano to tone-deaf British concert-goers, Victorian novels are filled with musical characters. Auerbach's fascinating and comprehensive study reveals that Dickens, Thackeray, Hardy, Eliot, and other novelists of -das Land ohne Musik- found music to be a rich source of metaphor."
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