The Motion Paradox

The epic tale of an ancient, unsolved puzzle and how it relates to all scientific attempts to explain the basic structure of the universe At the dawn of science the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno formulated his paradox of motion, and ...

Author: Joseph Mazur

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440649653

Category: Science

Page: 272

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The epic tale of an ancient, unsolved puzzle and how it relates to all scientific attempts to explain the basic structure of the universe At the dawn of science the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno formulated his paradox of motion, and amazingly, it is still on the cutting edge of all investigations into the fabric of reality. Zeno used logic to argue that motion is impossible, and at the heart of his maddening puzzle is the nature of space and time. Is space-time continuous or broken up like a string of beads? Over the past two millennia, many of our greatest minds—including Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, Stephen Hawking, and other current theoreticians—have been gripped by the mystery this puzzle represents. Joseph Mazur, acclaimed author of Euclid in the Rainforest, shows how historic breakthroughs in our understanding of motion shed light on Zeno’s paradox. The orbits of the planets were explained, the laws of motion were revealed, the theory of relativity was discovered—but the basic structure of time and space remained elusive. In the tradition of Fermat’s Enigma and Zero, The Motion Paradox is a lively history of this apparently simple puzzle whose solution—if indeed it can be solved—will reveal nothing less than the fundamental nature of reality.
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Zeno s Paradox

Unraveling the Ancient Mystery Behind the Science of Space and Time Joseph Mazur. PLUME Published by the Penguin Group ... The motion paradox: the 2,500-year-old puzzle behind all the mysteries of time and space/Joseph Mazur. p. cm.

Author: Joseph Mazur

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440639630

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 828

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The fascinating story of an ancient riddle and what it reveals about the nature of time and space Three millennia ago, the Greek philosopher Zeno constructed a series of logical paradoxes to prove that motion is impossible. Today, these paradoxes remain on the cutting edge of our investigations into the fabric of space and time. Zeno's Paradox uses the motion paradox as a jumping-off point for an exploration of the twenty-five-hundred-year quest to uncover the true nature of the universe. From Galileo to Einstein to Stephen Hawking, some of the greatest minds in history have tackled the problem and made spectacular breakthroughs, but through it all, the paradox of motion remains.
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The Illusion of Time Perception

Matters such as these are intelligibly explained by Joseph Mazur in his The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space (translated by Shun Matsuura/Hakuyosha). Joseph Mazur explains as follows: ...

Author: Norimichi Shuto

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN: 9781642730715

Category: Science

Page: 200

View: 910

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From his unique perspective, author Norimichi Shuto re-examines the mixed fields of knowledge expounded by Zeno, Descartes, Husseri, Galileo, Newton, Yojichiro and Einstein, and gives evidence that the perception of time is nothing but an illusion. He closes in on the essence of time without the use of formulas and by taking clues from time itself, as it passes right before our very eyes. In the process, by referring to the hypothesis that light is the source of our consciousness, our universe, and of all matter, the clues to understanding the Arrow of Time will ultimately be revealed.
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Law in the Time of Oxymora

See also Joseph Mazur, The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-YearOld Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space (New York: Dutton, 2007) and R. M. Sainsbury, Paradoxes, 3rd ed (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) at 4-21.

Author: Rostam J. Neuwirth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351170185

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 268

View: 774

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What do different concepts like true lie, bad luck, honest thief, old news, spacetime, glocalization, symplexity, sustainable development, constant change, soft law, substantive due process, pure law, bureaucratic efficiency and global justice have in common? What connections do they share with innumerable paradoxes, like the ones of happiness, time, globalization, sex, and of free will and fate? Law in the Time of Oxymora provides answers to these conundrums by critically comparing the apparent rise in recent years of the use of rhetorical figures called "essentially oxymoronic concepts" (i.e. oxymoron, enantiosis and paradoxes) in the areas of art, science and law. Albeit to varying degrees, these concepts share the quality of giving expression to apparent contradictions. Through this quality, they also challenge the scientific paradigm rooted in the dualistic thinking and binary logic that is traditionally used in the West, as opposed to the East, where a paradoxical mode of thinking and fuzzy logic is said to have been cultivated. Following a review of oxymora and paradoxes in art and various scientific writings, hundreds of "hard cases" featuring oxymora and a comprehensive review of the legal literature are discussed, revealing evidence suggesting that the present scientific paradigm of dualism alone will no longer be able to tackle the challenges arising from increasing diversity and complexity coupled with an apparent acceleration of change. Law in the Time of Oxymora reaches the surprising conclusion that essentially oxymoronic concepts may inaugurate a new era of cognition, involving the ways the senses interact and how we reason, think and make decisions in law and in life.
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The Illusion of Will Self and Time

Mazur, Joseph. (2007). The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space. New York: Dutton. McTaggart, J. Ellis. (1908). “The Unreality of Time,” Mind, 17(68) (October), 457–474. McTaggart, Lynne.

Author: Jonathan Bricklin

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438456270

Category: Psychology

Page: 405

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Discusses how William James’s work suggests a world without will, self, or time and how research supports this perspective. William James is often considered a scientist compromised by his advocacy of mysticism and parapsychology. Jonathan Bricklin argues James can also be viewed as a mystic compromised by his commitment to common sense. James wanted to believe in will, self, and time, but his deepest insights suggested otherwise. “Is consciousness already there waiting to be uncovered and is it a veridical revelation of reality?” James asked shortly before his death in 1910. A century after his death, research from neuroscience, physics, psychology, and parapsychology is making the case, both theoretically and experimentally, that answers James’s question in the affirmative. By separating what James passionately wanted to believe, based on common sense, from what his insights and researches led him to believe, Bricklin shows how James himself laid the groundwork for this more challenging view of existence. The non-reality of will, self, and time is consistent with James’s psychology of volition, his epistemology of self, and his belief that Newtonian, objective, even-flowing time does not exist.
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JIDR Vol 1 Number 1

The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year-Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space. New York (NY): Dutton. MCKINLEY, W., 2003. Postmodern Epistemology in Organization Studies: A Critical Appraisal. In: Locke, E. A. (ed.) ...

Author: IDRC Editors

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781105824159

Category:

Page: 143

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Plato s Philosophy Reaching Beyond the Limits of Reason

Motion paradox: The 2,500-year-old puzzle behind all the mysteries of time and space. New York: Dutton. McAdon, Brad (2004). “Plato's denunciation of rhetoric in the Phaedrus.” Rhetoric Review 21: 21–39. McCabe, Mary Margaret (2009).

Author: Harald Haarmann

Publisher: Georg Olms Verlag

ISBN: 9783487155425

Category: Philosophy

Page: 373

View: 532

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Platon zählt zu den einflussreichsten Philosophen aller Zeiten. Er beeinflusste maßgeblich Profil und Kanon der westlichen Philosophie. Die Kritik am sogenannten Platonismus wurde kontinuierlich von den Schwierigkeiten gespeist, die die Interpretation der philosophischen Schriften Platons bereitet. Gemeinhin wird er als rein rationaler Philosoph gesehen. Ein Philosoph war er in der Tat, ebenso jedoch ein Experte in der Annäherung an das Nicht-Rationale, unter anderem in Form von Mythen. So wurde er auch als "Mythenerfinder" und "Mythologe" bezeichnet. Platon war ein Visionär, der es wagte, das Reich des Nicht-Rationalen auf systematische und disziplinierte Art zu erforschen. Insgesamt lässt sich Platons philosophisches Vorhaben als Streben nach einer umfassenden Sicht des organischen Ganzen klassifizieren. Der Ausdruck „Gestalt“ scheint die Ganzheit am ehesten zu beschreiben. Platon kann als prominentester und auch als letzter Repräsentant der antiken Philosophie angesehen werden, der die Entwicklung einer Gestalt-Philosophie anstrebte. Plato is one of the most influential philosophers of all time. He decisively shaped the profile and canon of western philosophy. Criticism of what has become known as Platonism has been continuously nourished by the difficulties of interpreting this philosopher's writings. Plato is commonly viewed as a purely rational philosopher. A philosopher he was indeed, but Plato was also an expert in approaching the non-rational, in the form of mythology among others. Plato has been called a "mythmaker" and a "mythologist". Plato was a visionary who dared to explore the realm of the non-rational in a systematic and disciplined way. In an overall comparison, Plato's philosophical enterprise strives for a comprehensive perspective on the organic whole. The expression "Gestalt" seems to come closest to describing the wholeness. Plato may be considered to be the most prominent representative of classical philosophy to develop a Gestalt philosophy and also the last to do so in antiquity.
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Great Circles

The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-year-old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space. New York: Dutton. Pirsig, R. (1974). Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. New York: William Morrow & Co. Skidelsky, E. (2008).

Author: Emily Rolfe Grosholz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319982311

Category: Mathematics

Page: 274

View: 899

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This volume explores the interaction of poetry and mathematics by looking at analogies that link them. The form that distinguishes poetry from prose has mathematical structure (lifting language above the flow of time), as do the thoughtful ways in which poets bring the infinite into relation with the finite. The history of mathematics exhibits a dramatic narrative inspired by a kind of troping, as metaphor opens, metonymy and synecdoche elaborate, and irony closes off or shifts the growth of mathematical knowledge. The first part of the book is autobiographical, following the author through her discovery of these analogies, revealed by music, architecture, science fiction, philosophy, and the study of mathematics and poetry. The second part focuses on geometry, the circle and square, launching us from Shakespeare to Housman, from Euclid to Leibniz. The third part explores the study of dynamics, inertial motion and transcendental functions, from Descartes to Newton, and in 20th c. poetry. The final part contemplates infinity, as it emerges in modern set theory and topology, and in contemporary poems, including narrative poems about modern cosmology.
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What s Luck Got to Do with It

Euclid in the Rainforest: Discovering Universal Truth in Logic and Math (2006) The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year-Old Puzzle behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space (2007) Edited by Joseph Mazur Number: The Language of Science (2007)

Author: Joseph Mazur

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400834457

Category: Mathematics

Page: 296

View: 118

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The hazards of feeling lucky in gambling Why do so many gamblers risk it all when they know the odds of winning are against them? Why do they believe dice are "hot" in a winning streak? Why do we expect heads on a coin toss after several flips have turned up tails? What's Luck Got to Do with It? takes a lively and eye-opening look at the mathematics, history, and psychology of gambling to reveal the most widely held misconceptions about luck. It exposes the hazards of feeling lucky, and uses the mathematics of predictable outcomes to show when our chances of winning are actually good. Mathematician Joseph Mazur traces the history of gambling from the earliest known archaeological evidence of dice playing among Neolithic peoples to the first systematic mathematical studies of games of chance during the Renaissance, from government-administered lotteries to the glittering seductions of grand casinos, and on to the global economic crisis brought on by financiers' trillion-dollar bets. Using plenty of engaging anecdotes, Mazur explains the mathematics behind gambling—including the laws of probability, statistics, betting against expectations, and the law of large numbers—and describes the psychological and emotional factors that entice people to put their faith in winning that ever-elusive jackpot despite its mathematical improbability. As entertaining as it is informative, What's Luck Got to Do with It? demonstrates the pervasive nature of our belief in luck and the deceptive psychology of winning and losing. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
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The Outer Limits of Reason

Motion Paradox : The 2,500 - Year - Old Puzzle behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space . New York : Dutton , 2007 . Mendelson , Elliott . Introduction to Mathematical Logic . 4th ed . Boca Raton , FL : Chapman & Hall / CRC , 1997 .

Author: Noson S. Yanofsky

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262529846

Category: Science

Page: 419

View: 107

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An exploration of the scientific limits of knowledge that challenges our deep-seated beliefs about our universe, our rationality, and ourselves. Many books explain what is known about the universe. This book investigates what cannot be known. Rather than exploring the amazing facts that science, mathematics, and reason have revealed to us, this work studies what science, mathematics, and reason tell us cannot be revealed. In The Outer Limits of Reason, Noson Yanofsky considers what cannot be predicted, described, or known, and what will never be understood. He discusses the limitations of computers, physics, logic, and our own thought processes. Yanofsky describes simple tasks that would take computers trillions of centuries to complete and other problems that computers can never solve; perfectly formed English sentences that make no sense; different levels of infinity; the bizarre world of the quantum; the relevance of relativity theory; the causes of chaos theory; math problems that cannot be solved by normal means; and statements that are true but cannot be proven. He explains the limitations of our intuitions about the world—our ideas about space, time, and motion, and the complex relationship between the knower and the known. Moving from the concrete to the abstract, from problems of everyday language to straightforward philosophical questions to the formalities of physics and mathematics, Yanofsky demonstrates a myriad of unsolvable problems and paradoxes. Exploring the various limitations of our knowledge, he shows that many of these limitations have a similar pattern and that by investigating these patterns, we can better understand the structure and limitations of reason itself. Yanofsky even attempts to look beyond the borders of reason to see what, if anything, is out there.
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